Top 10 Stress Management Tips From The Experts

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It’s 8am, and your child still hasn’t woken up to go to school. You have a meeting at 8:30am, and your cat just puked on the floor. Stress. We all have it. But what if I told you that you could deal with stress practically, and effectively? I have round up some of my favourite top 10 stress management tips from leading experts including MD’s, Naturopathic Doctors, Nutritionists and Health Coaches.

Personally, I have adopted a raw vegan lifestyle that has significantly reduced the amount of stress I experience (I feel lighter, clear headed, and my moods have stabilized). Getting rid of processed junk foods is also important, as these foods mess with our brain chemistry and have us respond to “stressful” situations much more negatively.

I also suggest engaging in regular exercise and doing yoga at least 2-3 days a week. Yoga has helped me become less tense, able to relax better, and I have learned how to breathe, which in my opinion, is one of the most important tips in getting through stressful times.

These stress management tips have been tried and proven to work 99% of the time. Perhaps you have your own tips you would like to share below! Please leave a comment below, telling us how you have managed to reduce stress in your life!

These are 10 tips, of the 50 tips, written by Fawne Hansen. For the original post, click HERE.

stress management tips#1 Dr. Carolyn Dean

Medical Doctor, Naturopathic Doctor, Herbalist, Acupuncturist, Nutritionist, Lecturer and Author

http://www.drcarolyndean.com

To reduce stress my first and foremost recommendation is to take magnesium. But it has to be in the right form and you have to take enough of it. Magnesium is responsible for the activity of 700-800 enzyme systems that make energy, digest food, support the adrenal glands, detoxify heavy metals, relax your muscles and nerves and help you sleep well at night. We don’t get enough magnesium in our food so it’s important to take supplements.

Because I get the laxative effect with most types of magnesium, I use a liquid form that is 100% absorbed at the cellular level. It’s called ReMag and it’s picometer in size, which means it’s absorbed 100% at the cellular level and doesn’t even reach the large intestine to cause diarrhea. The trouble with magnesium therapy is that most people don’t get the therapeutic effect before they get the laxative effect.

If you want to know how much to take, get a Magnesium RBC blood test. You can order one online at www.requestatest.com for $49.00. Aim for a optimum level of 6.0-6.5mg/dL in a range of 4.2-6.8mg/dL, which is a measurement of magnesium levels in the general population who are 80% deficient.

#2 Reed Davis stress management tips

Founder of the Functional Diagnostic Nutrition (FDN) Course

http://functionaldiagnosticnutrition.com

In my practice, I find myself constantly counseling practitioners and clients on how to identify both EXTERNAL stressors like the demands of work and relationships and INTERNAL stressors such as inflammation, pain, and infections. Together, we use functional lab testing and a holistic grounding program to eliminate stressors and identify healing opportunities that support the body in building health.

Personally, I try to live my life as stress free as possible, which is not always easy with the growth of FDN, speaking engagements, new projects, and consulting work. To counter stress, I eat a nutrient dense diet, get proper rest and regular exercise. Additionally, I incorporate the following principals to keep myself grounded.

  1. A Clear Sense of Purpose. By clarifying what is most important, I can focus on one or two key things and focus less and delegate the less important, eliminating stress.
  2. Connect with Nature. Stepping outside and breathing in fresh air, walking barefoot on grass, and feeling the warmth of the sun on my skin energizes me and provides a valuable sense of inner peace.
  3. Relinquish Control. By surrounding myself with a team of talented individuals, colleagues, and friends with whom I can share challenges and burdens as well as joys and successes, creating a sense of community and shared responsibility.
  4. Laugh. The act of laughter instantly relieves stress. Finding humor in my life and not taking myself too seriously has always been in my stress reduction arsenal. I have also found humor to be a great tool to break the ice and put those around me at ease in an otherwise stressful situation.

kelly-austin#3 Dr. Kelly Austin, ND

Naturopathic Doctor, Clinic Director, CEO

http://atmyprime.com

There is light at the end of the stress tunnel! At my clinic, we cope with stress using nutrition and supplementation.

A proper vitamin B12 and vitamin B5 injection combo can really help with improving energy levels, mood, focus, memory, and adrenal health as well as relieving stress & anxiety, nerve pain, and burnout symptoms.

Internal physical stress can also be caused by improper food choices. Take a moment to see how your body reacts to common allergens like gluten, nuts, dairy, eggs, corn, and soy. Fill up on high quality nutritious proteins, organic fresh green vegetables, and delicious satiating fats.

Finally, taking 500-1,000mg of GABA supplementation with a physician’s recommendation and monitoring may significantly improve relaxation. Breathe deeply, eat well, and relax!

#4 Wendy Myerswendy-myers

Founder and writer of liveto100.com, Certified Holistic Health and Nutrition Coach

http://www.liveto100.com

Stress activates the sympathetic nervous system – the fight or flight part of your nervous system. To combat stress, you must activate your parasympathetic nervous system. You must activate this part of your nervous system to detox.

One of the best ways to access or activate this part of your nervous system is with a near infrared sauna. A near infrared sauna is comprise of 3-6 red infrared bulbs in an enclosure. This is one of the best methods to activate the parasympathetic nervous system, destress, calm the mind and sweat out dozens of heavy metals and hundreds of chemicals. You can’t do anything healthier for your body! I sit in my sauna for an hour at least 5 days a week!

stress management tips#5 Jen Whittman

Holistic health expertNaturopathic Doctor, Herbalist, Acupuncturist, Nutritionist, Lecturer and Author

http://www.thehealthyplate.org

To reduce stress my first and foremost recommendation is to take magnesium. But it has to be in the right form and you have to take enough of it. Magnesium is responsible for the activity of 700-800 enzyme systems that make energy, digest food, support the adrenal glands, detoxify heavy metals, relax your muscles and nerves and help you sleep well at night. We don’t get enough magnesium in our food so it’s important to take supplements.

Because I get the laxative effect with most types of magnesium, I use a liquid form that is 100% absorbed at the cellular level. It’s called ReMag and it’s picometer in size, which means it’s absorbed 100% at the cellular level and doesn’t even reach the large intestine to cause diarrhea. The trouble with magnesium therapy is that most people don’t get the therapeutic effect before they get the laxative effect.

If you want to know how much to take, get a Magnesium RBC blood test. You can order one online at www.requestatest.com for $49.00. Aim for a optimum level of 6.0-6.5mg/dL in a range of 4.2-6.8mg/dL, which is a measurement of magnesium levels in the general population who are 80% deficient.

#6 Dr. Hyla Casshyla-cass

Board-Certified In Psychiatry And Neurology, As Well As In Integrative And Holistic Medicine

http://www.drcass.com

Before rushing to take antidepressant and anti-anxiety prescriptions, with their side effects including possible addiction, try one of the many safe, effective natural remedies. Techniques such as meditation can also be extremely effective. Here are some helpful tips to stress-proof yourself:

  • Nutrients like the herbs (hops, passion flower) and amino acids (theanine, glycine, taurine) that help calm you down by acting on the GABA system in the brain.
  • Adaptogenic herbs that support the adrenal glands while enhancing energy, improving mood and promoting inner balance.
  • Be careful not to over-indulge in such habits as alcohol, drugs, or overeating.
  • Eat healthy, regular meals to avoid rapid fluctuations in your blood sugar levels. Stress uses up many of the nutrients that we need to be fully functional emotionally and physically. These nutrients should be included in the diet and even taken as supplements. You can cover all bases by taking a high potency multi-vitamin and mineral combination, that includes Vitamin B complex, vitamin C magnesium, potassium, zinc, chromium, and manganese. Essential fatty acids in the form of fish, fish oil, and flax oil are also important buffers against stress.
  • Deep relaxed breathing is an excellent anxiety and stress reducer, and overall tension reliever.
  • Make sure to get enough sleep, since sleep deprivation alone can make all these responses much worse.
  • Monitor your moods and feelings. If you’re feeling down or worried, spend time with your friends and family rather than being alone.
  • Helping others is a great remedy for anxiety and depression. Don’t forget hugs — natural, safe, free, and mutually beneficial!

rae-indigo#7 Rae Indigo

Yoga Teacher, Blogger

http://www.raeindigoyoga.com

My philosophy is, rather than cope with stress, to use preventative measures to keep it from arising in the first place. I start by distinguishing between good stress and bad stress. As we all know a certain amount of stress is necessary to keep us motivated, otherwise we would tend to become lethargic and sedentary. When we observe nature it’s easy to see that there is no evolution without a certain amount of stress, but if that stress becomes prolonged (chronic), then suffering ensues and health issues are likely to follow. Coping with stress means that we have reached that point where our overall wellness is compromised and then something must be done or the condition becomes progressive.

The following is a short list of some of the things I do to stop stress in its tracks when it becomes excessive or chronic.

Breathe. When I feel as if my pot is about to boil over, I breathe, slowly, deeply and most of all mindfully. It’s amazing how just a minute or two of conscious breathing can bring about a state of calm.

Eat well. The more plant-based foods the better. They also keep your system alkaline. Meats and other heavy protein foods, refined sugars, trans fats, fast foods and processed foods all set up an acid condition in the body, and an acid system produces inflammation, and inflammation causes stress.

Exercise. I do yoga, but anything that gets your body moving is good; take a brisk walk for 20 minutes every day, go to the gym, ride a bike, take up swimming, Tai Chi, Aerobics, Pilates, resistance/strength training, the list is endless, but do something that raises your heart rate just to the point where you’re about to break a sweat.

Rest. A good night’s sleep is always a stress buster. You’ll wake up to a brand new day and a new perspective after a good night’s rest. If the first three tips on this list are followed, it is pretty well assured that you’ll sleep soundly.

#8 Kelly Brogan, MDkelly-brogan

Holistic Women’s Health Psychiatrist

http://kellybroganmd.com

Here’s what to do when you feel stressed:

  1. Notice and acknowledge your discomfort.
  2. Relax and release it no matter how urgent it feels. Let the energy pass through you before you attempt to fix anything.
  3. Imagine sitting back up on a high seat, in the back of your head watching your thoughts, emotions, and behavior with a detached compassion.
  4. Then ground yourself. Connect to the present moment – feel the earth under your feet, smell the air, imagine roots growing into the earth from your spine.

Do this in a spirit of non-judgment because this isn’t an exercise done for mastery; it’s a decision that you make every time you feel disturbed inside.

Integrating these practices or routines into your life may do more than support longevity and optimal health. It may reverse chronic disease, eliminate the need for medications, and most importantly confer a greater sense of life satisfaction, happiness, and freedom to be here, in the present, where the wonder of this never-before-existent moment is unfolding before you.

chris-lemig#9 Chris Lemig

Writer, Speaker, And Student Of Tibetan Buddhism

http://www.thenarrowwaybook.com

I may be a Buddhist but I still get stressed. Work, writing, study, and other commitments pile up and the result for me is often a twisted, knotted stomach full of stress.

But fortunately, the Buddhist tool kit is full of all kinds of great things I can use to ease that suffering.

My favorite technique is a spin on a Buddhist practice called The Four Immeasurable Emotions. I just work with the first two: Immeasurable Love and Compassion.

When I get stressed, I try to recall that I’m not the only one in the world who’s having such stressful feelings. In fact, most sentient beings suffer from stress many times throughout the course of any given day.

I then tell myself:

“May I and all beings be free from stress and worry. May I and all sentient beings be well and at ease. May we all find temporary and ultimate happiness”.

This does two things: It takes the focus off of me, effectively crashing the pity party. Second, it puts things into perspective and gives me some space from my own stress.

Give this practice a try and see if it works for you.

#10 Keri Brookskeri-brooks

Functional Diagnostic Nutritionist, Functional Medicine Practitioner, Corporate Holistic Health Educator and Personal Trainer

http://www.endeavorfitwell.com

Here are my 4 simple ways to reverse adrenal fatigue (AKA “Feel Like Crap Syndrome”):

  1. Eat Real Food. Processed foods, GMO’S , sugar, caffeine, and fake fats lead to chronic inflammation and nutritional deficiencies. When this happens, your adrenal function slows down resulting in exhaustion, poor sleep, weight loss resistance and increased irritability.
  2. Sleep MATTERS. One of the most taxing stressors on your adrenal glands is poor sleep or lack of sleep. Ideally, you should be in bed by 10pm and wake up by 6:30am. Practice good sleep hygiene by having a consistent wind down routine. I personally love to end the day with an Epson Salt bath which helps with muscle relaxation and deeper sleep.
  3. Stop skipping meals and overeating. Low and high blood sugar is a quick way to burn out your adrenals and shut down your metabolism. Try to schedule your meals every 3-4 hours and balance them with protein, fat and veggies.
  4. Breathe, laugh, do Yoga and have SEX. Mediation, restorative yoga and sex have all demonstrated huge benefits towards lower cortisol levels, and turning on your parasympathetic nervous system. The result: you feel relaxed and revitalized!

 

     
Carly Fraser has her BSc (Hons.) Degree in Neuroscience, and is the owner and founder at Live Love Fruit. She currently lives in Winnipeg, Manitoba, with a determined life mission to help inspire and motivate individuals to critically think about what they put in their bodies and to find balance through nutrition and lifestyle. She has helped hundreds of thousands of individuals to re-connect with their bodies and learn self-love through proper eating habits and natural living. She loves to do yoga, dance, and immerse herself in nature.

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